Uncle Bardie’s Spotlight Creator: Creator: Archaeologist Heinrich Schleimann

Once a week on Friday, Uncle Bardie celebrates the creativity in others by shining a Spotlight on a movie, a song or a creator. This week’s Spotlight Creator is the archaeologist Heinrich Schleimann:

The Discovery of Troy

The Adventure Continues at Mycenae

These films are from the Michael Wood BBC’s “In Search of the Trojan War”.

 

Uncle Bardie’s Spotlight Movie: Dad

Once a week on Friday, Uncle Bardie celebrates the creativity in others by shining a Spotlight on a movie, a song or a creator. To celebrate this Sunday’s Father’s Day, this week’s Spotlight Movie is “Dad” (1989):

I never knew my father. My mother took me and left my father when I was six months old. She left him because she was working her fingers to the bone and my father would not work. I jokingly accuse my father of being the laziest man in the State of Alabama. So I always carried this burden around with me that he wasn’t there.

Now the story I heard was that my mother wouldn’t let him contact me when I was growing up. Then I became an adult and he could have made the effort. But he did not.

When I was younger, I got angry every time I thought about him. I’ve gotten over that. I have forgiven him. That’s his burden, not mine.

If I had a Dad, what would he have been like? I would hope he was like Jake Tremont (Jack Lemmon) who was a man with a heart as large as the great outdoors. A man who loved his family, and loved them so much he gave his life for his family. He did it with nary a complaint.

Now I know there are a lot worse fathers than a Jake Tremont. But I also know that a boy needs a father and mine was Missing In Action. And, on Father’s Day each year, I find myself missing the man more and more.

There are those who believe that a child doesn’t need a father. To me, that’s a lot of hogwash.

For all of you who had great Dads, I hope you really really appreciate the love they gave you and the role model they were for you. Because I am thinking that there are a lot more great Dads than there are lousy fathers.

For all those great Dads, here is a song to remind you what you mean to your children:

 

 

Uncle Bardie’s Spotlight Song: While My Guitar Gently Weeps

Once a week on Friday, Uncle Bardie celebrates the creativity in others by shining a Spotlight on a movie, a song or a creator. This week’s Spotlight Song is George Harrison’s beautiful “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”:

Cirque du soleil’s interpretation.

And here’s Carlos Santana’s lovely rendition:

When someone asks me “Who is your favorite Beatle”, I tell them the Beatles are my favorite Beatle. But deep down I know that is not true. It’s George I saw in concert. It’s George whose albums I bought. It’s George I listened to in The Traveling Wilburys with his buds, Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, Roy Orbison and Jeff Lynne.

Sure, I listen to John when I want to let my intellectual and political side out. I listen to Paul if I go dancing. I listen to Ringo just for the fun of it. But it’s George that most appeals to me. Especially the post-Beatles George. Among my DVDs, I have the “Concert for George”, performed one year after George’s death by many of his friends including his best bud, Eric Clapton.

“While my Guitar Gently Weeps” is among my all-time Beatles favs. It tops the list that includes “Norwegian Wood”, “Help”, “Eleanor Rigby”, “You’re Gonna Lose that Girl”, “Nowhere Man”, “Michelle”, “Lady Madonna”, “Girl”, “Things We Said Today”, “I Feel Fine”, “Get Back”, “The Ballad of John and Yoko”, “A Day in the Life”, “She’s Leaving Home” and “Fool on the Hill”.

 

Uncle Bardie’s Spotlight Movie: I am a human being

Once a week on Friday, Uncle Bardie celebrates the creativity in others by shining a Spotlight on a movie, a song or a creator. This week’s Spotlight is the movie, “The Elephant Man” (1980):

“I am not an animal. I am a human being.” These are the words of John Merrick (John Hurt). He is so deformed he becomes known as the Elephant Man. He is a side show freak when Frederick Treves (Anthony Hopkns), a surgeon at London Hospital, discovers him. David Lynch’s film is the story of Merrick and Treves’ friendship.

“I am not an animal. I am a human being.” Mistreated most of his life, Merrick blossoms under the care of Treves. Treves discovers that despite his deformity Merrick holds no enmity toward any one. It turns out that he is quite intelligent and kind. Unbelievably kind and gentle.

“I am not an animal. I am a human being.” With his life, John Merrick teaches that it is not appearance that matters. It is the person inside. When the curtain of cruelty and unkindness is ripped away, John Merrick’s light shines brightly.

“I am not an animal. I am a human being.” As Merrick comes out of his shell, Treves is changed as well. Merrick gives Treves his soul back.

“My life is full. I know that I am loved.” These too are John Merrick’s words. “The Elephant Man” is a masterpiece and a tribute to the humanity that was John Merrick.

Uncle Bardie’s Creator: Rais Bhuiyan and Forgiveness

Once a week on Friday, Uncle Bardie celebrates the creativity in others by shining a Spotlight on a movie, a song or a creator. This week’s Spotlight Creator is Rais Bhuiyan: