Uncle Bardie’s Spotlight Song: Mama, This One’s For You

Once a week on Friday, Uncle Bardie celebrates the creativity in others by shining a Spotlight on a movie, a song or a creator. This week’s Spotlight is for Mother’s Day. It is song, Beth Hart’s “Mama, This One’s For You“.

Happy Mother’s Day to all the Mothers out there. We love you and thank you for putting so much into making us who we are.

And I have to say that Beth Hart has never sounded better than she does on this one.

Uncle Bardie’s Spotlight Song: Where’s the love?

Once a week on Friday, Uncle Bardie celebrates the creativity in others by shining a Spotlight on a movie, a song or a creator. This week’s Spotlight Song is the Black Eye Peas with “Where’s the love”:

1 John 4:20. Whoever claims to love God yet hates a brother or sister is a liar. For whoever does not love their brother and sister, whom they have seen, cannot love God, whom they have not seen.

 

Uncle Bardie’s Spotlight Song: True Love

Once a week on Friday, Uncle Bardie celebrates the creativity in others by shining a Spotlight on a movie, a song or a creator. This week’s Spotlight is the song: “True Love” with Bing Crosby & Grace Kelly.

It’s a little early for Valentine’s Day but I thought “True Love” would be a perfect song for the holiday.

Before she was a Princess, Grace Kelly was an actress. She was the new bride in “High Noon”. She was the wrongly accused in Hitchcock’s “Dial M for Murder”. She was a cheating wife in “Mogambo”. She was Jimmy Stewart’s girlfriend in Hitchcock’s “Rear Window”. As you can see, she was Hitchcock’s favorite before she went off to Monaco. Her final picture was a musical remake of “The Philadelphia Story” called “High Society” (1956). She played the Katherine Hepburn part. Bing Crosby did the Cary Grant role and Frank Sinatra played the Jimmy Stewart part.

One of the songs in “High Society” is “True Love”. Composed by Cole Porter, it joins so many other songs that became a part of what has been called The Great American Songbook. Before Chuck Berry, before the Beatles, before Bob Dylan, before Prince and Michael Jackson, there was The Great American Songbook. It consists of standards from the 30s, the 40s and the 50s. More than standards, these are often perfect songs, the music and lyric memorable. They set a standard for what a good song could be.

They were composed by some of our best composers of popular song. Some of the masters were Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, and George and Ira Gershwin. And the songs have never gone out of style. They have been recorded by Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole, Linda Ronstadt, Willie Nelson, Michael Feinstein, Harry Connick Jr., Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett.

Uncle Bardie’s Weekly Music Pick: Light One Candle

It’s Thursday again. You know what that means. Uncle Bardie’s Weekly Music Pick. Uncle Bardie gives a double thumbs up to this week’s selection: “Light One Candle” by Peter, Paul, and Mary. This one is for Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights.

 

 

Uncle Bardie’s Weekly Music Pick: Room at the Table

It’s Thursday again. You know what that means. Uncle Bardie’s Weekly Music Pick. Uncle Bardiie gives a double thumbs up to this week’s selection. “Room at the Table” by Carrie Newcomer:

I know it’s Christmas, and some of you are saying, “Where’s your Christmas song”. Well, this one is my Christmas song. It gets to the spirit of what Christmas is. On top of the lyric of the song, the music makes you want to get up and dance. And what a great video. I just love them giraffes and those dancers. So Merry Christmas, y’all.